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Mark Bonn: Biosecurity for Travelers in the Post-Pandemic Era


Mark Bonn

Ph.D. In Tourism Marketing

Chairman of Bonn Marketing Research Group, Inc.


Gender: Male

Work experience: Professor (Full),1989 - 2020, Florida State University,College of BusinessTallahassee, United States,Research primarily in the areas of tourism and hospitality strategy, sustainable tourism, consumer behavior, online purchasing behavior, wine tourism, supply chain management and market segmentation.




Educational experience:

1979.6 - 1982.5,Texas A&M University,Field of study,Recreational Resource Development

1975.9 - 1977.5,Appalachian State University,Field of study,Resort Management, Recreation & Physical Education

1969.8 - 1973.6,Furman University,Field of study,Political Science


Mark Bonn: Biosecurity for Travelers in the Post-Pandemic Era


Mark A. Bonn is a professor at Florida State University, USA, and he received his ph.D in Tourism Marketing. Dr. Mark Bonn researches primarily in the areas of tourism and hospitality strategy, sustainable tourism, consumer behavior, online purchasing behavior, wine tourism, supply chain management and market segmentation. He has published many articles and books in his field, including: A Constraint-Based Approach to Wine Tourism Market Segmentation, Factors Affecting Pandemic Biosecurity Behaviors of International Travelers: Moderating Roles of Gender, Age, and Travel Frequency.


Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020, different types of economies around the world have been hit by large or small shocks, and the tourism economy is one of the most affected by the pandemic. In recent years, various countries and regions have developed corresponding measures to deal with the pandemic, and the world seems to have entered the post-pandemic era of relatively moderate COVID-19. The Center interviewed Dr. Mark Bonn for his views on tourism development in the post-pandemic era.


When asked how the biosecurity behaviors of travelers will change in the post-pandemic era, Dr. Mark Bonn put forward the most concerning potential issue with the Covid-19 pandemic: “relatively eased”. Because the incidents of Covid-19 still exist in varying degrees throughout the world, there is no destination that can assume to be “100% Covid-19 Free.” Thus, traveler biosecurity behavior will remain vigilant. Proof of vaccination will still remain as the #1 safeguard for reducing incidents of contracting Covid. Thus, safety products such as masks and sanitization products will still be used heavily, and especially in crowded settings, such as within cities, shopping districts, food service areas, attractions, and urban transportation modes where large groups of individuals commonly congregate.


Recently, epidemics such as monkeypox and poliomyelitis have been raging in some areas. In response to COVID-19 and recent epidemics, future tourism-related biosecurity interventions are also likely to undergo long-term changes. As previously mentioned, proof of vaccination will remain the highest standard of protection. Testing pre-flight and upon arrival will continue to be administered, with mandatory quarantine to be expected for those travelers showing positive following testing. Aside from this, more rural experiences by visitors will become increasingly in demand. Rural communities may face challenges regarding their current available ‘supply’ of products to meet the needs of travelers, such as adequate numbers of lodging and dining facilities to accommodate increased numbers of visitors, causing many rural destinations to develop management plans and policies designed to optimize safety for both residents and visitors.

In Dr. Mark Bonn’s publication: “Traveler Biosecurity Behavior during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Effects of Intervention, Resilience, and Sustainable Development Goals”, he concluded that focusing on feelings of resilience may be useful to boost tourist confidence to travel to specific destinations. To promote tourism in the post-epidemic era, some specific strategies could be used to enhance the resilience feelings of the tourists. Visitor resilience correlates with their perceptions of destination/travel safety and those measures used to protect health and well-being of residents and visitors. Study validated that US international travelers would be more willing to wear masks on all flights than face an undetermined period of quarantine at the destination. To mitigate the potential for negative visitor perceptions, destinations must use social media to promote their areas by emphasizing programs and policies they have enacted regarding safe and secure travel with respect to pandemics.


2022.10.20


Contactor:Long Yixun

Interviewer: Long Yixun

Proofreader: Zhou Yaqi

Editor:Wang Yunjie




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